Policing in the Square Mile

<image301085.png>
<image657142.png>
<image074592.png>
<image779603.png>
<image274232.png>
<image946863.png>
<image960019.png>
<image286502.jpg>
<image944591.png>

City of London Police – SME Alert

You will no doubt be aware that on Tuesday 23 May, the independent Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre (JTAC) raised the threat level for international terrorism in the UK to CRITICAL. This means that their assessment is not only that an attack remains highly likely but a further attack may be imminent.

What does this mean for the Square Mile?

Protecting the City as a global financial centre and the resident community continues to be a key priority for the City of London Police. As you would rightly expect, we are doing everything possible to keep our communities safe.

This means that as you move around the City expect to see a visible police presence. City of London Police will be conducting high visibility patrols around key locations in the Square Mile including transport hubs and crowded places. Alongside high visibility patrols you will also see an increase in armed officers.

In the wider London area you can also expect to see the military deployed alongside the police at certain locations. This is to allow armed police who normally undertake guarding duties to support the wider police response. This is part of an agreed and well-rehearsed plan and military personnel will remain under the command and control of the police service.

Project Servator

Across the Square Mile the City of London Police will also be deploying officers on targeted Project Servator patrols.

Project Servator is a cutting-edge policing tactic pioneered by the City of London Police that uses specialist police officers trained to spot the tell tale signs that a person may be carrying out hostile reconnaissance or committing other crime. The approach is based on extensive research into the psychology of criminals and what best undermines their activities.

Project Servator is a key tool in deterring those with criminal intent and it also increases the opportunity for interaction between police officers and the public

Our advice to you

Our message is clear: remain calm but alert.

If you see anything that causes you concern, please let us know immediately. Early reporting is key; the sooner we know about something, the quicker that we can act.

  • Look out for anything that seems out of place, unusual or doesn’t fit in with day-to-day life. It may be nothing but if you see or hear anything that could be terrorist related trust your instinct no matter how small the ACT and call 999.
  • We need businesses to continue to support this effort by ensuring your own staff and buildings are prepared to deal with an attack.
  • It is important for security staff to know and clearly understand their roles and what is expected of them at this time
  • We continue to offer support through Project Griffin and Project Argus.
  • Where you have them, we encourage your security staff to be vigilant and proactive in monitoring your business areas for suspicious activity.
  • Where businesses are co-located, we recommend that you work together to ensure your shared areas are protected.
  • Try and minimise crowds at your business and make sure you are aware of who is coming in and out of your premises.
  • Keep buildings secure where appropriate.
  • Pay attention to areas around exits, especially when large numbers of staff and customers are due to leave.
  • You should also review your building and business continuity plans in light of the attack. Ensure that first aide points are fully stocked and the location of key equipment is made clear to all staff.

More information can be found on the National Security Terrorism Security Office

City of London Police
For non-emergency crime dial 101
In an emergency dial 999

@CityPolice

To update your contact details click here

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s